BALL STATE UNIVERSITY RECEIVES AMERICAN BATTLEFIELD PROTECTION PROGRAM GRANT

 

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY RECEIVES AMERICAN BATTLEFIELD PROTECTION PROGRAM GRANT

Congratulations to our partners at Ball State University for their successful grant application to the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program!

Ball State University, in partnership with the Fort Recovery Historical Society and the Ohio Historical Society, has conducted an archaeological exploration of the Fort Recovery and Battle of the Wabash battlefields. This work has added considerably to our understanding of the battles and the extent to which their archaeological traces are still discernible across the landscape of the modern city of Fort Recovery.

On November 4, 1791, at the Battle of the Wabash, a coalition of American Indian tribes led by the Miami chief Little Turtle and the Shawnee chief Blue Jacket destroyed an American army sent against their people. This was the most catastrophic defeat ever suffered by the United States at the hands of American Indians. In 1773, General Anthony Wayne built Fort Recovery on the site of this epic, but surprisingly little known, battle. On June 30, 1794, 2,000 American Indians attacked the fort, but were repulsed after a two day battle. As part of the NPS grant, Ball State University and its partners intend to hold a series of public consensus meetings in support of Fort Recovery. This project also will support the creation of a more complete and comprehensive National Register nomination.

According to the NPS website, “The American Battlefield Protection Program funds projects conducted by federal, state, local, and tribal governments, nonprofit organizations, and educational institutions. The ABPPs mission is to safeguard and preserve significant American battlefield lands for present and future generations as symbols of individual sacrifice and national heritage.”

Brad Lepper

Posted September 10, 2012
Topics: Archaeology

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