TRIBUTE TO ANCIENT GARDENERS AND INDIGENOUS EARTHWORKS AT KROHN CONSERVATORY IN CINCINNATI


The Krohn Conservatory in Cincinnati presents a tribute to Ohio’s ancient American Indian legacy! From now through October 26th, waving prairie grasses and fall splendors of the harvest including pumpkins, gourds and sunflowers will fill the 2014 Fall Floral Show, Ancient Gardeners: Indigenous Earthworks. Curving smoothly through the middle of the showroom floor will be a replica of the Great Serpent Mound consisting of hundreds of spider plants framed by a small trickling creek and surrounded by burnt orange, red, and yellow mums with pops of brilliant blue asters. Indigenous plants important to the midwestern American Indians will be showcased in this show including the Arrowwood Viburnum, Amaranth, Nicotiana, and “the three sisters” — maize, beans and squash. The Great Serpent Mound is located in Adams County, Ohio atop a plateau overlooking the Brush Creek Valley and is the largest mound effigy in the world, measuring over 1,300 feet long. The mound was likely built by the ancient American Indian Fort Ancient culture and is over 4,500 years old, which is 1,000 years older than the ancient pyramids of Egypt! Come experience the beautiful fall flowers and learn about the amazing ancient gardeners and their incredible indigenous earthworks! The show designer is Krohn Florist, Bethany Butler. Ms. Butler is intrigued by the history of indigenous cultures and she has always wanted to design a show that highlights some of that rich history.

Posted September 30, 2014
Topics: Archaeology

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