Know Before You Go

What to know about the site:

William Henry Harrison had expressed a desire to be buried on Mt. Nebo in North Bend, Ohio, with its wide view of the Ohio River and of the corners of three states – Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. Nearby is Congress Green Cemetery, the family burial grounds of his in-laws, the Symmes. 

His body was brought back in a river procession of black-draped barges. He was buried on July 7, 1841, in a simple family tomb on the summit of Mt. Nebo. In 1871 the Harrison family sold its estate, with the exception of the six acres comprising Congress Green Cemetery. That same year, the president’s son, John Scott Harrison, offered the site and the tomb to the state of Ohio, on condition that it be preserved. The state failed to act on the offer and it was not until decades of neglect and vandalism that the state took an active role in 1919 

Then commissions appointed by Governor James Cox, and later by Governor Martin Davey, acquired the tomb from the heirs in the name of the state of Ohio. The plot was landscaped and a formal entrance, composed of two pillars supporting eagles with spread wings, was erected. In 1924, a memorial obelisk was dedicated. Its sturdy and simple design symbolizes the character of the man it honors. 

The shaft of Bedford limestone, faced with marble at the entrance, rises 60 feet above the tomb. From a flagstone terrace visitors have a spectacular view of the Ohio Valley, although not the same view as in Harrison’s day. 

In 1934, the Legislature placed the protection and management of the tomb with the Ohio Historical Society. Six additional acres were acquired. 

The tomb itself contains twenty-four vaults, containing the bodies of William Henry Harrison; his wife, Betty, who died in 1864; their son, John Scott, father of President Benjamin Harrison; and other members of the family. Several sealed vaults are unmarked. 

The site is open daily, during daylight hours from March to mid-December. It is also open the weekend nearest Harrison birthday, February 9. Hosted by the site’s local manager, the Harrison Symmes Committee, activities include a memorial walk from the North Bend Municipal Building to the tomb for the presidential wreath laying ceremony. A luncheon follows the program. 

Admission to the site is Free 

While you are there, visit Congress Green Cemetery, final resting place of many members of the Symmes Family, who were instrumental in the settlement of the now Cincinnati area. 

Harrison Tomb is located in North Bend in Hamilton County, 15 miles west of Cincinnati. It is located on Cliff Rd, west of US 50. 
TIMELINE: 
July-August 1997 
Volume 14/Number 4 
• CAESAR AND THE CONQUEST OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY 
The Harrison Campaign, 1811 
by Allan R. Millett 
September-October 1997 
Volume 14/Number 5 
• CAESAR AND THE CONQUEST OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY The Second Harrison Campaign, 1813 
by Allan R. Millett 
October-December 2005 
Volume 22/Number 4 
• LOG CABIN FEVER 
Waving the Harrison Banner 
by Roger A. Fischer 
• OHS ALBUM 
THE HARRISON TOMB