Distance Learning

The Ohio Historical Society is home to one of the nation’s premiere providers of Distance Learning content.  Our award-winning program offers interactive, informative and engaging experiences that bring history to life while reinforcing the importance of the past with real-life experiences.

Our catalog of more than 20 live, interactive programs cover everything from Ohio’s geologic history and prehistoric Native American cultures through the Civil War and into the issues facing our country today.  Formats vary from game show formats like our “So You Know” series, to first-person interpretation and question-and-answer sessions with experts in the field, and each show is customizable to the age and content standards needed to reinforce learning in a unique, fun way.

We were one of the first content providers to partner with community organizations and retirement communities, helping to foster opportunities for life-long learning and engagement with our nation’s history.  In 2012, we have also become one of the first major content providers to deliver our full catalog to desktop computers, allowing schools and organizations without traditional videoconference equipment to experience live, interactive learning over a basic Internet connection.

Feel free to contact our Distance Learning program at dl@ohiohistory.org or by phone at (800) 640-7679, or use our program catalog below to schedule your next session and make history come alive.

Ask the Archaeologist
The staff and professionals of the Ohio Historical Society are at your disposal in this interactive, question/answer presentation.  Spend time talking with a member of our Archaeology staff about the science of archaeology, recent discoveries and conclusions, and a day in the life of an archaeologist.
  

Click here for more program and scheduling information.

Can She Trust You?

Students travel back to 1860 to interact with residents of the Ohio Village to help Rowena, a runaway slave trying to find her way to freedom.  To help save Rowena, students listen for clues in the residents’ conversations and ask questions of each resident to determine which individual is a conductor on the Underground Railroad.  Topics such as politics, religion, economics, education, and secession will be discussed over the course of the presentation.

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Exploring History: Glaciers, Grooves, Fens and Forts

In this natural history program, students meet Dr. Zooki, an eccentric scientist who takes them along as he explores and examines the geological effects of the Ice Age thousands of years ago.  Students interact with him as they learn the cause-and-effect relationship of three Ohio landforms created by glaciers.

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Mound Building Cultures

Explore the mound building cultures of ancient Ohio in this presentation hosted by Dr. Bradley Lepper, Curator of Archaeology for the Ohio Historical Society.  Students will learn about the various types of mounds, how mounds were built, why mounds may have been built, what daily life might have been like as a member of these cultures, and how these cultures evolved as they experience a virtual tour of various mound sites in Ohio and across the nation.

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Picture This: Interpreting the Past with Photographs

Students interact with an archivist as they learn to interpret and analyze photographs stored in the Ohio Historical Society's photographic collection.  They learn the importance of images as a source of recording history and the stories these images tell.  We'll examine details of fashion, architecture, technology, customs, lifestyles, gender roles and more, and also instruct students how they decipher the stories of images in their own photographic collections.

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Pieces of the Past: Introduction to Primary Sources

In this program students will learn the difference between primary and secondary sources and be able to distinguish between the two.  A museum curator hosts the program and provides real-life examples of primary sources.  In addition, the students will visit curators in our archives, our collections facility and our sites to learn more about the variety of primary sources including archival material (newspapers, photographs, scrapbooks), collections items  (historic Civil War battle flags) and sites (prehistoric earthworks and artifacts).

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Show Me, Tell Me: The Impact Europeans Had On American Indians

This presentation looks at American Indians and their transition from the prehistoric period to the historic period (European Contact) around AD 1650 - 1700.  Students will look at prehistoric items used by the Eastern Woodland Indians, compare and contrast prehistoric tools with historic tools, discover how the Europeans changed the way the American Indians lived, how metal was introduced, and how furs were traded.  Over the course of the presentation, students will learn about the difference between prehistory and history and also examine historic trade items including clothing, cast iron pots, jewelry, tools, artifacts, and more.

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So You Know the Civil War?
No other period in our nation's history has captured our interest more than the events of 1861 through 1865.  This interactive game show tests your students on the causes, conflicts, and consequences of this era.

Categories and level of difficulty vary by grade level to create a fun, energetic program that is tailor-made to reinforce learning and expand comprehension of historical events.

Possible categories include:
Before the War - events prior to the outbreak of the Civil War
Civil War Geography - famous places, boundaries, and geographical features of the Civil War
Civil War Battles - famous places and battles of the Civil War
All About Abe - questions about Abraham Lincoln
State Status - defining what states were free or slave states or territories
Picture This - analyzing Civil War era photographs/visuals
A Soldier's Life - a day in the life of a soldier
Slavery - history of slavery, abolitionism and famous abolitionists
Timeline - organizing the events prior to, during, and after the Civil War
Ohio and the Civil War - Ohio names and places of the Civil War
The Aftermath - events and legislation passed after the conclusion of the Civil War
Women and the War - the role of women in the Civil War
  

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So You Know the Election?
Test your knowledge of the people, policies and events from the elections of the past and present with this interactive game show.  Teams of students compete against each other to answer questions about the election process, the history of past elections, voting requirements and responsibilities, candidates, and more.  Teachers will also be given the opportunity to submit their own questions for students in our Teacher’s Choice category.
  

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So You Know the Founding Documents?

Test your knowledge of our nation’s roots with this interactive game show.  Teams of students compete against each other to answer questions about the concepts, people and historical context behind the documents that form the fabric of our democracy.  Questions are tailored to specific grade levels to help maximize learning and retention.

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So You Know the U.S. Government?

How well do you know the United States Government?  This interactive, energetic game show  tests your students’ knowledge of the origins, structure, and responsibilities of our government.  Topics include the documents that defined the foundations of our government and how the three branches of government come together to govern our country.  Whether you’re beginning to introduce students to the workings of government or are looking for a fun way to reinforce learning, our So You Know series provide a unique learning experience for students of all ages.

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So You Know Ohio?
This highly interactive game show tests your students’ knowledge of Ohio history through 10 different categories, and is customizable to meet grade-level curricula and content standards.
    
Categories include:
  • How to Make History - Where we find historical sources
  • Ohio Symbols - A look at famous symbols of Ohio
  • Places and Faces - Famous Ohio locations and people
  • Which Came First? - Putting famous events and people in chronological order
  • Its Your Duty - A look at citizenship in Ohio
  • The Peoples Choice - A look at government in Ohio
  • Where?s Waldo? - A review of map skills
  • Show Me the Money - A look at economics in Ohio
  • Ohio Hodgepodge - A look at famous Ohio places and people
  • Likes and Dislikes - A look at different cultural groups in Ohio
  • Its Your Duty - A look at citizenship in Ohio
  • The Peoples Choice - A look at government in Ohio
  • Where?s Waldo? - A review of map skills
  • Show Me the Money - A look at economics in Ohio
  • Ohio Hodgepodge - A look at famous Ohio places and people
  • Likes and Dislikes - A look at different cultural groups in Ohio

Our So You Know series is a fun, energetic way to reinforce classroom learning and expand your students’ knowledge of our nation’s history.
  

Click here for more program and scheduling information.

You Can Make History: Home Sweet Home

Meet Arbuckle, a 200-year-old turtle in this series that helps students build a foundation for an understanding of history and the effects of the passage of time and change by comparing and contrasting their lives today with that of early settlers. 

In Home Sweet Home, students will learn about the development of a farmstead. We’ll also examine the building and interior of a settler's home, looking at furnishings and daily living needs.

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You Can Make History: How Do We Get There?

Meet Arbuckle, a 200-year-old turtle in this series that helps students build a foundation for an understanding of history and the effects of the passage of time and change by comparing and contrasting their lives today with that of early settlers. 

In How Do We Get There?, we’ll explore the circumstances that lead Arbuckle’s family to move to Ohio. We’ll discuss the different forms of transportation used to make their journey from the East Coast and the challenges that accompanied cross-country travel during those days.

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You Can Make History: Trees, Trees, Trees

Meet Arbuckle, a 200-year-old turtle in this series that helps students build a foundation for an understanding of history and the effects of the passage of time and change by comparing and contrasting their lives today with that of early settlers.

In Trees, Trees, Trees, students will learn how settlers used trees in their daily life and why they were so important to settlers and the continued importance of trees in modern times.

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You Can Make History: What Shall I Do Today?

Meet Arbuckle, a 200-year-old turtle in this series that helps students build a foundation for an understanding of history and the effects of the passage of time and change by comparing and contrasting their lives today with that of early settlers.

In What Shall I Do Today, students will explore daily frontier life, gender roles, chores and responsibilities, along with leisure time activities.

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The Story of the Carved Potato: The Origins of the Jack-'O-Lantern

Ever wonder why we carve faces into pumpkins for Halloween? When the Irish immigrants came to America, they brought their own beliefs and traditions, which over time became part of American tradition. In this program, you'll hear the story of Old Wicked John and how Jack-'O-Lanterns came to be a part of our Halloween tradition.

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The Story of the Strange Bird: The Origins of Thanksgiving

Our national bird, the bald eagle, was not the first choice of one of our Founding Fathers. The bird that almost became our national bird is only found in America. We celebrate a special day with this bird every November. Participants in this program will learn about the origins of Thanksgiving, who was responsible for it becoming a national holiday, and the prominent bird that almost was our national symbol.

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The Story of the Triangular Tree: The Origins of Christmas Trees

Many of our traditions in America originated in other countries and were brought by those who immigrated here. Can you imagine hanging your Christmas tree from the ceiling? Why do we even have Christmas trees in our homes at this time of year? In this program, we’ll follow the story of the Triangular Tree from the forests of Germany to the modern homes of America. Participants discover that not all folks were happy to celebrate the holiday season using this tradition and the very first tree in America was not a tree at all!

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